Extract from David Parmenter’s  Working Guide: Should I Stay or Should I Go? 

Choosing an organisation and a life partner have much in common.  During the courtship both parties are on best behaviour, all adverse behaviour traits are well disguised.  Promises are made, and even lies told, to give the impression that in the future, life is going to be so much better together.  We find, as time passes, that indeed the grass is not greener on the other side of the fence.  Also, our needs change with time meaning that a move may be inevitable.  However, often if the right discussions are held, then both you and the organisation can move forward together.

Before we go any further on this topic you need to know where you are going.  Otherwise “Any road will take you there.”

Let us find out a bit about ourselves.  Answer these questions.

1.   Have you worked for a blue-chip company? □ Yes □ No
2.   Have you worked for a great manager? □ Yes □ No
3.   Have your worked under an inspirational CEO? □ Yes □ No
4.   Have you managed a large team? □ Yes □ No

 

If you can answer yes to all these questions decision making is going to be far easier.  We all need to have worked for a great manager and under an inspirational CEO.  It will help use decide whether we want a long-term career in management. By expanding your experiences, you will be in a better position to make decisions.

You now need to consider your long-term career objectives

5.   Do I see my long-range goal as working in a large organisation? □ Yes □ No
6.   Or do I want to be running my own company? □ Yes □ No
7.   Do you know the lifestyle you want to achieve? □ Yes □ No
8.   Are you willing to sacrifice a work life balance for your future career? □ Yes □ No
9.   Have you a vision of what your end goal is for your career? □ Yes □ No
10.Do you yearn to work in another country? □ Yes □ No

 

The answers will now begin to shape a future which may look very different to what it is now.

We should now look at the fit with your current organisation

Current organisation checklist

Extract from David Parmenter’s  Working Guide: Should I Stay or Should I Go? 

Current Job
1.   Are you excited when you look at the opportunities ahead in your job? □ Yes □ No
2.   Are there other roles, opportunities, projects you could work on at your current job that are interesting? □ Yes □ No
3.   Do you enjoy working with your current staff and colleagues? □ Yes □ No
4.   Does this job make the best use of your skills? □ Yes □ No
5.   Are there still opportunities to implement better practices? □ Yes □ No
Current Manager
6.   Do you enjoy working with your manager? □ Yes □ No
7.   Are you still learning from your manager? □ Yes □ No
8.   Is your manager well-respected and liked in the organisation? □ Yes □ No
9.   Has your manager had a good career to date? □ Yes □ No
10.Is your manager in the inner circle with the CEO? □ Yes □ No
Current Organization
11.Can you fulfil your next three-year career goals within your current organisation? □ Yes □ No
12.Are there other managers in the organisation you would enjoy working with? □ Yes □ No
13.Are you proud to work for your organisation? □ Yes □ No
14.Is your current rate of pay in the top quartile for your position and experience? □ Yes □ No
15.Are you given good training and development opportunities? □ Yes □ No
 

Number of Ticks

 

Advice to You

 

Extract from David Parmenter’s  Working Guide: Should I Stay or Should I Go? 

 

Number of Ticks

 

Advice to You

10 or more Really stupid to leave, the grass is not greener on the other side of the fence.
7-9 Only move on if the organisation or manager is changing for the worse.
4-6 Start looking for a new position elsewhere, but only leave when you have another job lined up.
<4 You should have left ages ago.